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Living With Wildlife

Mallard Ducks - Songbirds - Racoons - Opossums - Squirrels - Raising Wild Animals

1. Canada Geese

During the second year of their lives, Canada Geese find themselves a mate. Most couples stay together all of their lives. If one is killed, the other may find a new mate. Breeding season for the Canada goose is from late April through early June. The female lays 4-8 eggs and both parents protect the nest while the eggs incubate, but the female spends more time at the nest than the male. During that time, they lose their flight feathers, so that they cannot fly until after their eggs hatch. This period lasts for 25-28 days. The nest is made of dry grass, moss, sticks, and bark chips, and is lined with downy feathers. The female will usually only produce one clutch a year. However, if they lose their eggs or are forced to abandon the nest, they will continue breeding until they are successful or until the breeding season ends. Within 24 hours of the last egg hatching the parents move their young to water. Geese may nest up to 5 miles away from the nearest water source. The young are able to fly at approximately 9 weeks of age. Canada geese are monogamous for life and are known to return to successful nesting sites.


2. Mallard Ducks


Mallards are seasonally monogamous, switching mates each year. The male is very colorful, with an iridescent green head and white collar, while the female’s coloring is brown-streaked to help her blend into her surroundings while she is incubating her eggs. The mallard has only three defenses: swimming, flying, and camouflage, and is prey to large mammals. Prior to laying her eggs, the female will increase her weight so she can incubate the eggs. The female lays 7-12 eggs and the incubation period is approximately 23 days. The male leaves after the first week of incubation to join the male flocks. The female is responsible for raising her young and only produces 1 brood a year. However, if she loses her eggs or is forced to abandon the nest, she will breed again until she is successful. After the last egg hatches, the female takes her young to water within 24 hours. This trip can be up to 1 mile. The young are able to fly within 7 to 9 weeks. The female is known to return to successful nesting sites.

Deterrent Techniques

Manicured lawns, neighborhood pools, retention ponds of subdivisions, industrial and business complexes, and golf courses provide excellent habitat. Conflicts with people usually arise in the spring and summer months during the breeding season. They may hiss or chase people who get too close to the nest or flock.

There are many short term deterrent products or techniques that can be used, such as plastic or live swans, fake alligators in a pool/pond, brightly colored streamers or balloons in or around a pool/pond. For a long-term solution, landscaping with native plants is recommended for open spaces and the perimeter of pools/ponds. Trees and bushes in yards and tall grass plantings around pools/ponds add natural beauty and may provide hiding spaces for predators. Landscaping to decrease the open space will make the area less attractive to geese and ducks.

What To Do When You Find A Lost or Abandoned Duckling

Contact your local wildlife rehabilitation center as soon as possible.
Canada geese and mallards are protected by federal law. It is illegal to keep them, even for a short period of time. They have specialized nutritional, housing and handling needs that you are unlikely to be able to provide. Inexperienced individuals who attempt to raise or treat them inevitably produce an unhealthy, tame animal that cannot survive in its natural habitat.

Feeding Waterfowl Is Not Recommended

  • People who feed wild birds are unknowingly enticing the birds into delaying their migration and encouraging them to become permanent residents.
  • Thousands of waterfowl concentrate in areas because food handouts are non-threatening and easily attainable. They will lose their fear of people and pick up habits that conflict with humans.
  • Food handouts often result in large numbers of birds competing for very limited food supplies in small concentrated areas. Crowding and competition for food combined with the stresses of less nutritious food and harsh weather increases their susceptibility to life-threatening diseases such as avian cholera, duck plague and avian botulism. These diseases have the potential to kill large numbers of waterfowl.

What Not To Do

  • All native birds (geese and mallard ducks included) are protected by the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act. It is illegal for any person to possess nesting material, eggs, feathers, bones or a live bird without the proper permits from U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. It is also illegal to harm or kill a protected bird species and it is illegal to remove or destroy nesting material. The law does not protect three birds: the Pigeon (rock dove), the English house sparrow and the European starling.
  • Once a nest is established (first egg laid), it is illegal to destroy it.
  • Never remove eggs or young from the nest.
  • Do not use poisons. They are inhumane and may be illegal. They can result in secondary poisoning of raptors, wild scavengers and neighborhood pets.

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3. Songbirds

There are numerous native and migratory songbirds. This information provides a variety of general songbird information. If you have questions regarding a specific species, please call or visit us.

Deterrent Techniques for Birds

Perching

To deter birds from perching in a specific area, such as a ledge, window air conditioner, balcony railing, or specific area of a roof, try one of the following:
* Stretch a Slinky® or bird coil over the space you want to deter the birds from. The Slinky® or bird coil stretched out is an unstable surface and the birds will not attempt to perch.
* For a more permanent deterrent, glue or fasten porcupine wire. Porcupine wire can be purchased at a local home center.

Nesting

  • If birds are starting to build a nest in an unwanted place, play a radio near the area to scare off the birds (talk show or hard rock music will be most disruptive). Hang bright colored streamers, strips of material, windsocks or curling ribbon to keep birds from continuing to build their nest. Note: All native birds are protected by law; it is illegal to destroy/remove the nest once it is completed. See the “What NOT To Do” section for additional legal information.
  • Place hardware cloth around outside dryer vent to prevent birds from nesting or roosting inside.

Bird Loose in House

  • Confine the bird to one room, turn off the lights and open a door or window. Leave the room. The bird will instinctively fly towards light and escape.

What Not To Do

  • All native birds are protected by the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act. It is illegal for any person to possess nesting material, eggs, feathers, bones or a live bird without the proper permits from U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. It is also illegal to harm or kill a protected bird species and it is illegal to remove or destroy nesting material. The law does not protect three birds: the Pigeon (rock dove), the English house sparrow and the European starling.
  • Once a nest is established (first egg laid), it is illegal to destroy it.
  • Never remove eggs or young from the nest.
  • Do not use poisons. They are inhumane and may be illegal. They can result in secondary poisoning of raptors, wild scavengers and neighborhood pets.

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4. Racoons

Although raccoons prefer woodlands near water, cities and suburbs provide both adequate food and shelter. They are easily identified by their bandit’s mask and ringed tail even if they are not frequently seen due to their nocturnal habits. By nature they are shy, but often become bolder when living in close proximity to humans. They are very dexterous and intelligent, which often leads to what people perceive as mischief. Raccoons are valuable scavengers and help maintain ecological balance.

Preventing Problems With Raccoons

  • Do not encourage raccoons by feeding them.
  • Keep pet food and watering dishes inside, especially at night.
  • Do not allow spillage to accumulate outside bird feeders.
  • Keep grills and barbecues clean. Even the smallest food scraps may attract raccoons.
  • Trim tree limbs that provide easy access to your roof.
  • Repair broken, weak, or rotted areas on your roof.
  • Install and maintain chimney caps before animals move into your chimney.
  • Do not keep garbage cans outside if possible.
  • Use welded wire to exclude animals from underneath decks
  • Use welded wire on the inside of attic vents to deny access to the attic if the vent cover is removed.
  • Form hardware cloth around the outside dryer vent to prevent birds from nesting.

Raccoons Living in Your Yard

Raccoon dens are made above ground in tree cavities, chimneys, attics, garages, and underground in old woodchuck burrows, under decks, storm sewers or crawl spaces under buildings. Raccoons do not hibernate during the winter, although they will stay in their dens for prolonged periods of time especially in inclement weather. Raccoons use their dens for bearing young, winter sleep, and temporary shelter. Communal denning is common- up to 23 raccoons have been reported in a single den with usually only one adult male present. Most animals only use our homes temporarily during March through August to raise their young. If at all possible, consider “living with them” until the young leave the nest at 8-10 weeks of age.

Deterrent Techniques

  • Wrap a 4’-6’ wide piece of aluminum flashing around tree trunks so that the raccoons cannot get a foothold on the bark. Make sure the aluminum flashing is a minimum height of 4 feet from the ground. This will deny raccoons access to the tree and your roof. This technique provides an immediate solution, however it is recommended to leave the flashing up for 5 to 7 days.
  • Grease downspouts with a mixture of petroleum jelly and crushed red pepper. The raccoons will be unable to climb the downspout due to the slippery surface. This technique provides an immediate solution, however it is recommended to keep the downspouts greased for 5 to 7 days.
  • Place lighting (such as bright flashlights, flood lamp, blinking strands of holiday lights, etc.) in their den. It is best to leave the lights on 24 hours a day. If this is not possible, the lights must be on during the day to disturb the animal’s sleep.
  • Play a radio (portable alarm clock, noisy children’s toy, anything that plays music or makes noise repeatedly) either in or near their den. It is best to leave the radio on 24 hours a day. If this is not possible, the radio must be on during the day to disturb the animal’s sleep.
  • Place rags soaked in ammonia in the den area for one week. Ammonia has an irritating smell. Over time the ammonia will dissipate and it is important to re-soak the rags on a daily basis. We do not recommend using ammonia soaked rags during baby season (March-August). It may injure infant wildlife, which are too young to escape.
  • If a den site has been established in a chimney (usually on the smoke shelf in the fireplace flue) use the same techniques listed above. Lower a light down into the chimney, place a bowl of ammonia on the fireplace grate and place a radio inside the fireplace as well. Do not try to ‘smoke out’ the animal. They can be overcome with smoke and then you will be faced with physically removing them yourself.
  • Deterrent techniques should be used for at least 7-10 days and it is important to use all the techniques at the same time in order for the deterrents to be successful.
  • To determine if the animal has left the den site, wad up newspaper and pack it into the den entrance. If the raccoon is still using the den, the newspaper will be pulled out. If after a few days the newspaper has not been disturbed, securely repair any access openings. Failure to do so may result in the raccoon or another animal moving in.

Raiding Your Garbage Cans

  • The simplest solution is to bring the cans inside where raccoons cannot reach them. If this is not possible, pour 1 cup of ammonia inside the garbage can or sprinkle black pepper on the top bag inside the garbage can. Another deterrent is to place rags soaked in ammonia over the top of the garbage can lid and secure with bungee cords. Use the techniques for a 5 to 7 day period or use when putting garbage out for your weekly pick up.

Grubs:

  • Raccoons and skunks may tear up lawns in search of grubs. Cayenne pepper and rags soaked in ammonia can be placed in the area that is affected. Another option is to mix 8 oz. Dawn Dish Soap ®, a handful of chewing tobacco and water in a lawn sprayer and spray on the affected grass area. We cannot tell you with 100% certainty that these techniques work, but they are worth trying. Contact the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Illinois at (630) 653-4114 for additional advice.

Communal bathroom area:

  • Clean up feces and place ammonia rags around the area. Do not handle feces with bare hands, use gloves or a shovel. Re-soak the rags in ammonia daily and continue to use for one week.

Gardens

  • Exclusion is always the best technique. Build a 4’ high chicken wire fence around the garden leaving the top 12” to 18” unattached to any support and bent outward. The raccoon’s weight will pull the fence downward, landing him right back where he started. Taste deterrents will work also, however they will need to be reapplied after a heavy dew or rain. Recommended taste deterrents are: mixing 2 tablespoons of hot sauce with 1 gallon of water, make a garlic puree and spray onto plants, sprinkle baby powder on the entire plant or check with your local nursery or home center for commercial products.

What Not To Do

  • Please remember that it is illegal to keep wild animals even for a very short time. They have specialized nutritional, housing, and handling needs that you are unlikely to be able to provide. Inexperienced individuals who attempt to raise/treat them inevitably produce an unhealthy, tame animal that cannot survive in its natural habitat
  • Trapping and removing raccoons is illegal without the proper permits and is not always the solution to the problem. Removing the animal creates an open space for another animal. Trapped adults may be leaving young behind to die of starvation in an inaccessible area. Focus on removing the attraction, not the animal.
  • Never move young from the nest.
  • Do not use poisons. They are inhumane and may be illegal. They can result in secondary poisoning of raptors, wild scavengers and neighborhood pets.

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5. Opossums

The opossum is the only marsupial found in North America. Marsupials reproduce in a unique manner in which the young are born in an embryonic form and make their way into a pouch, or marsupium, where they are nourished. At approximately 80 days of age the young may leave the pouch for short periods of time, clinging to their mother’s side and back. Young opossums are on their own when they are 8” to 9” in length from their nose to the base of their tail. Opossums are nocturnal and mostly live a solitary life. Opossums are a shy and secretive animal. They are not aggressive and a common means of defense is faking death or “playing possum.” When frightened they may show their teeth or “alligator face” and hiss.

Preventing Problems With Opossums

  • Do not encourage opossums by feeding them.
  • Keep pet food and watering dishes inside, especially at night.
  • Do not allow spillage to accumulate outside bird feeders.
  • Keep grills and barbecues clean. Even the smallest food scraps may attract opossums.
  • Do not keep garbage cans outside if possible.
  • Cover window wells.
  • Use welded wire to exclude animals from underneath decks.

Opossums Living in Your Yard

Opossums prefer to live in wooded areas near streams. Cities and suburbs provide adequate food and shelter. Common den and resting sites include abandoned woodchuck burrows, hollow logs, wood or brush piles, under buildings, elevated sheds, openings under concrete slabs and porches and access to crawl spaces under houses. Inside the cavity a nest is made of leaves and grass. Opossums are capable climbers and may take shelter by day in trees or old squirrel nests. Most animals only use our home temporarily during March through August to raise their young. If at all possible, consider “living with them” until the young are on their own at approximately 5 months of age.

Deterrent Techniques

  • Place lighting (such as bright flashlights, flood lamp, blinking strands of holiday lights, etc.) in their den. It is best to leave the lights on 24 hours a day. If this is not possible, the lights must be on during the daytime to disturb the animal’s sleep.
  • Play a radio (portable alarm clock, noisy children’s toy, anything that plays music or makes noise repeatedly) either in or near their den. It is best to leave the lights on 24 hours a day. If this is not possible, the lights must be on during the daytime to disturb the animal’s sleep.
  • Place rags soaked in ammonia in the den area for one week. Ammonia has an irritating smell. Over time the ammonia will dissipate and it is important to re-soak the rags on a daily basis. We do not recommend using ammonia soaked rags during baby season (March-August). It may injure infant wildlife, which are too young to escape.
  • Deterrent techniques should be used at least 7-10 days and it is important to use all the techniques at the same time in order for the deterrents to be successful.
  • To determine if the animal has left the den site, wad up newspaper and pack it into the den entrance. If the opossum is still using the den, the newspaper will be pulled out. If after a few days the newspaper has not been disturbed, securely repair any access openings. Failure to do so may result in the opossum or another animal moving in.

Opossums Raiding Your Garbage Cans

The simplest solution is to bring the cans inside where opossums cannot reach them. If this is not possible, pour 1 cup of ammonia inside the garbage can or sprinkle cayenne pepper on the top bag inside the garbage can. Another deterrent is to place rags soaked in ammonia over the top of the garbage can lid and secure with bungee cords. Use the techniques for a 5 to 7 day period or use when putting garbage out for your weekly pick up.

Opossums and Gardens

Exclusion is always the best technique. Build a 4’ high chicken wire fence around the garden leaving the top 12” to 18” unattached to any support and bent outward. The opossum’s weight will pull the fence downward, landing him right back where he started. Taste deterrents will work also, however they will need to be reapplied after a heavy dew or rain. Recommended taste deterrents are; mixing 2 tablespoons of hot sauce with 1 gallon of water, make a garlic puree and spray onto plants, sprinkle baby powder on the entire plant or check with your local nursery or home center for commercial products.

What Not To Do

  • Please remember that it is illegal to keep wild animals even for a very short time. They have specialized nutritional, housing, and handling needs that you are unlikely to be able to provide. Inexperienced individuals who attempt to raise/treat them inevitably produce an unhealthy, tame animal that cannot survive in its natural habitat.
  • Trapping and removing opossums is illegal without the proper permits and is not always the solution to the problem. Removing the animal creates an open space for another animal. Focus on removing the attraction, not the animal.
  • Never move young.
  • Do not use poisons. They are inhumane and may be illegal. They can result in secondary poisoning of raptors, wild scavengers and neighborhood pets.

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6. Squirrels

The two common species of tree squirrels in the bay area are fox squirrels and gray squirrels. Both species have easily adapted to suburban neighborhoods. Gray squirrels have gray to black fur. Fox squirrels are reddish in color and are larger than gray squirrels. Gray squirrels have a smaller home range and are more social, while fox squirrels have a larger home range and are more solitary.

Preventing Problems With Squirrels

  • Do not encourage squirrels by feeding them.
  • Do not leave pet food and watering dishes outside.
  • Do not allow spillage to accumulate outside bird feeders.
  • Keep grills and barbecues clean. Even the smallest food scraps may attract squirrels.
  • Trim tree limbs that provide easy access to your roof.
  • Repair broken, weak, or rotted areas on your roof.
  • Install and maintain chimney caps before animals move into your chimney.
  • Use welded wire on the inside of attic vents to deny access to the attic if the vent cover is removed.

Squirrels Living in Your Yard

Squirrels use two basic types of natural dens: tree cavities and leaf nests. However, they will also build nests in attics, garages, and eaves. Squirrels are active during the day, foraging for food in the early morning and late afternoon. They do not hibernate during the winter, although they will become less active during inclement weather. Squirrels use two or more nests concurrently throughout the year. Females have two litters a year. The first litter is born between February and April, the second litter between August and September. If at all possible, consider “living with them” until the young leave the nest at 10 to 12 weeks of age.

Deterrent Techniques

  • Wrap a 4’-6’ wide piece of aluminum flashing around tree trunks so that the squirrels cannot get a foothold on the bark. Make sure the aluminum flashing is a minimum height of 4’ from the ground. This will deny squirrels access to the tree and your roof. This technique provides an immediate solution, however it is recommended to leave the flashing up for 5 to 7 days.
  • Grease downspouts with a mixture of petroleum jelly and crushed red pepper. The squirrels will be unable to climb the downspout due to the slippery surface. This technique provides an immediate solution, however it is recommended to keep the downspouts greased for 5 to 7 days.
  • Squirrels are agile enough to walk on power lines and telephone lines. The techniques listed above may work to deny squirrels access to the pole which the wire is attached. Watch the squirrels to see how they are getting to the wires to determine if these techniques will work.
  • Place lighting (such as bright flashlights, flood lamp, blinking strands of holiday lights, etc.) in their den. It is best to leave the lights on for 24 hours a day. If this is not possible, the lights must be on during the nighttime to disturb the animal’s sleep.
  • Play a radio (portable alarm clock, noisy children’s toy, anything that plays music or makes noise repeatedly) either in or near their den. It is best to leave the radio on for 24 hours a day. If this is not possible, the radio must be on during the nighttime to disturb the animal’s sleep.
  • Place rags soaked in ammonia in the den area for one week. Ammonia has an irritating smell. Over time the ammonia will dissipate and it is important to re-soak the rags on a daily basis. WRI does not recommend using ammonia soaked rags during baby season (February - September). It may injure infant wildlife, which are too young to escape.
  • If a den site has been established in a chimney (usually on the smoke shelf in the fireplace flue) use the same techniques listed above. Lower a light down into the chimney, place a bowl of ammonia on the fireplace grate and place a radio inside the fireplace as well. Do not try to “smoke out” the animal. They can be overcome with smoke and then you will be faced with physically removing them yourself.
  • Deterrent techniques should be used for at least 7-10 days and it is important to use all the techniques at the same time in order for the deterrents to be successful.
  • To determine if the animal has left the den site, wad up newspaper and pack it into the den entrance. If the squirrel is still using the den, the newspaper will be pulled out. If after a few days the newspaper has not been disturbed, securely repair any access openings. Failure to do so may result in the squirrel or another animal moving in.

Squirrels Raiding the Bird Feeders

Exclusion is always the best solution. Grease down the feeder pole with petroleum jelly or grease. Mix crushed red pepper into birdseed to keep squirrels from eating at the feeder. The pepper will not affect the birds for they have a poorly developed sense of taste. A variety of squirrel deterrents for feeders are available at specialty bird supply stores.

Squirrels Eating Bulbs

Daffodils, squills, grape hyacinths and crown imperial bulbs are known to be distasteful to squirrels. The crown imperial has a horrible smell and below ground diners are known not to go anywhere near it. Interplant crown imperials among tulips and other “tasty” bulbs. Use chicken wire as a barricade by placing it on the flower bed surface and scatter a light layer of mulch or leaves over the chicken wire. Be sure to pick up bulb skin that flaked off during planting and spread a thick layer of mulch over the bulbs to remove any signs of recent planting. The chicken wire should be pulled up in early spring so the bulbs can grow.

Squirrels and Gardens

Taste deterrents that may be used to spray on plants are a mixture of 2 tablespoons of hot sauce with 1 gallon of water or a garlic puree. Check with your local nursery or home center for commercial products. Taste deterrents will need to be reapplied after a heavy dew or rain. Ammonia soaked rags can also be placed around planters to keep squirrels from eating plants.

Squirrels Gnawing on wood

Mix petroleum jelly and crushed red pepper and spread onto the affected area. Placing ammonia soaked rags may also be affective.

Squirrel Loose in House

A squirrel that has entered a house has done so by accident. If its exact location is known, close interior doors to limit its access inside the house. In the area the squirrel is contained, open a window or exterior door. If left alone, the squirrel will find the opening and leave. A squirrel can readily jump from a second story window onto a grassy area without harming itself (although a first floor exit is preferable and a squirrel should never be forced to jump from that height). If this is not an option, set a live trap in the area the squirrel is contained. Place a trail of bait 12” outside the trap going into the trap and leave it alone for a few hours. Once the squirrel is trapped, release outside on your property. Releasing the squirrel on your property is your only legal option, unless you have obtained the proper permits.

What Not To Do

  • Please remember that it is illegal to keep wild animals even for a very short time. They have specialized nutritional, housing, and handling needs that you are unlikely to be able to provide. Inexperienced individuals who attempt to raise/treat them inevitably produce an unhealthy, tame animal that cannot survive in its natural habitat.
  • Trapping and removing squirrels is illegal without the proper permits and is not always the solution to the problem. Removing the animal creates an open space for another animal. Trapped adults may be leaving young behind to die of starvation in an inaccessible area. Focus on removing the attraction, not the animal.
  • Never move young from the nest.
  • Do not use poisons. They are inhumane and may be illegal. They can result in secondary poisoning of raptors, wild scavengers and neighborhood pets.

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7. Raising Wild Animals

Keeping Young Wild Animals At Home Is Bad For THEM

  • Commercial milk replacement formulas, even those that claim to be adequate for use in wild species, are not designed for anything other than kittens and puppies. Natural milk varies substantially between species so it is unreasonable to expect that a single formulation will satisfy the nutritional requirements of multiple species. Providing the correct balance of protein, fat and carbohydrates is critical during growing periods in order to ensure proper development of bones, teeth, eyes and other organs. In addition, the percentage of sugars in natural milk is variable. Animals fed too high a concentration of sugar in a formula develop diarrhea; too low can cause constipation. Both can be fatal in a young animal. Baby birds require specially designed diets that range in type from strict vegetarian to pure carnivore depending on the species.
  • Much of what juvenile animals do, besides grow, is to learn about what is “normal.” They learn this by being exposed to things in their natural environment and by watching the behavior of their parents and siblings. If animals are deprived of their natural environment and interactions with others of their own species, they are not able to learn what they need to survive: how to find food, where to seek shelter, how to recognize and avoid predators, and how to play, fight and breed with members of their own species. Not only are we preventing them from learning what is “normal,” but we are also teaching them “abnormal” or inappropriate behaviors including that humans are a source of food and shelter.

Keeping Young Wild Animals At Home Is Bad For YOU

  • Juvenile animals grow up to be adults and while juvenile animals often defend themselves by hiding or “freezing,” adult animals defend themselves by biting, scratching, and clawing. Even something as innocent looking as a cottontail rabbit can inflict severe scratches with its strong hind legs when it is frantic to get away. Squirrels can bite a human finger to the bone and raccoon bites are equivalent to those of a much larger dog.
  • Wild animals you raise may incorporate your home and yard into their territory as they grow older. This will throw them into direct competition with your pets and other neighborhood animals. They may continue to view you as a source of food and can become aggressive and destructive if it is not provided. In extreme situations, they may even view humans as members of their own species. Hormonally induced behavior during mating season can be particularly obnoxious and dangerous.
  • Wild animals carry diseases that are transmissible to humans and pets. Reptiles are known carriers of salmonella, a bacterial disease that results in diarrhea and dehydration and can even cause death in severely affected individuals. Mammals all carry external parasites (lice and fleas) that usually do not infest humans, but can potentially be a problem for your pets. Ticks can spread disease between their original host and any other susceptible animal. Any mammal (although raccoons are the particular culprit) can carry microscopic roundworm intestinal parasites that can cause severe disease or even death if accidentally ingested by a human or pet. Although children with their less developed sense of hygiene are at particular risk, even adults can inadvertently expose themselves. Other intestinal parasites (protozoa) such as giardia and cryptosporidium can cause diarrhea diseases similar to salmonella. Familiar sounding diseases such as rabies and bubonic plague and less familiar ones like tularemia, while rare in this area are not unheard of, and can kill a person if left untreated.

All Native Wild Animals Are Protected By State and Federal Laws

Please remember that it is illegal to keep wild animals without a license, even for very short periods of time. Wild animals, particularly babies, have very specialized nutritional, housing, and handling needs that you are unlikely to be able to provide. Well meaning but inexperienced individuals who attempt to raise them inevitably produce an unhealthy, tame animal that cannot survive in its natural habitat.

Wildlife Rescue, Inc. has been issued the necessary permits to provide rehabilitation and captive rearing for native wild animals. The Wildlife Rescue, Inc. staff is comprised of individuals with degrees and experience in the fields of wildlife medicine, wildlife rehabilitation, animal husbandry, natural history and ecology.

 

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